We Can Trust God with Free Will

Open Theism is the Christian doctrine that the future is not settled but open because God is alive, eternally free, and inexhaustibly creative. Exclusive: Here on OpenTheism.org you can enjoy the entire James White vs. Bob Enyart Open Theism Debate conducted this month of July 2014 at Denver's historic Brown Palace hotel.

Open Theism Debates

Is the Future Settled or Open? Samuel Lamerson vs. Bob Enyart. Dr. Lamerson is professor of New Testament and interim president of Knox Theological Seminary which was founded by the late D. James Kennedy. Since 1991 Pastor Bob Enyart of Denver Bible Church has hosted a daily talk radio program.

James White vs. Bob Enyart -- Open Theism: Is the Future Settled or Open? The OpenTheism.org team organized the July 8, 2014 debate between leading reformed theologian Dr. James White and OT proponent Pastor Bob Enyart held before a live audience in downtown Denver's historic Brown Palace hotel.

Chris Fisher Debates a Calvinist on God’s ability to deceive, the nature of Jesus, and prophecy.

God is Open Aurora Colorado's Calvary Chapel pastor Ed Taylor and DBC pastor Bob Enyart informally debate on the radio about God being eternally free, inexhaustibly creative, and able to have new thoughts.

Will Duffy debates an Arminian Pastor Jaltus on the freedom that God had before creation.

Open Theism Debate The North American Reformed Seminary (TNARS) president Dr. Larry Bray vs. Colorado pastor Bob Enyart.

See also the open theism debates in the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society.


Honorable Mention: Related Debates

Former Calvinist Austin Fischer debates James White on the British radio program Unbelievable. (mp3 audio right here)

Is Calvinism Biblical? debate between TNARS president Dr. Larry Bray vs. Bob Enyart which is hosted at TheologyOnline.com, the official forum of OpenTheism.org.

 

The OpenTheism.org Blog

Chris Fisher from God is Open for OpenTheism.org...

Calvin on Genesis 6:6

From Calvin’s commentary on Genesis:

6. And it repented the Lord that he had made man on the earth The repentance which is here ascribed to God does not properly belong to him, but has reference to our understanding of him. For since we cannot comprehend him as he is, it is necessary that, for our sakes he should, in a certain sense, transform himself. That repentance cannot take place in God, easily appears from this single considerations that nothing happens which is by him unexpected or unforeseen. The same reasoning, and remark, applies to what follows, that God was affected with grief. Certainly God is not sorrowful or sad; but remains forever like himself in his celestial and happy repose: yet, because it could not otherwise be known how great is God’s hatred and detestation of sin, therefore the Spirit accommodates himself to our capacity. Wherefore, there is no need for us to involve ourselves in thorny and difficult questions, when it is obvious to what end these words of repentance and grief are applied; namely, to teach us, that from the time when man was so greatly corrupted, God would not reckon him among his creatures; as if he would say, ‘This is not my workmanship; this is not that man who was formed in my image, and whom I had adorned with such excellent gifts: I do not deign now to acknowledge this degenerate and defiled creature as mine.’ Similar to this is what he says, in the second place, concerning grief; that God was so offended by the atrocious wickedness of men, as if they had wounded his heart with mortal grief: There is here, therefore, an unexpressed antithesis between that upright nature which had been created by God, and that corruption which sprung from sin. Meanwhile, unless we wish to provoke God, and to put him to grief, let us learn to abhor and to flee from sin. Moreover, this paternal goodness and tenderness ought, in no slight degree, to subdue in us the love of sin; since God, in order more effectually to pierce our hearts, clothes himself with our affections. This figure, which represents God as transferring to himself what is peculiar to human nature, is called ἀνθρωποπάθεια


Filed under: Calvinism, Critics

VOTD Psalms 16:8

Psa 16:8 I have set the LORD always before me; Because He is at my right hand I shall not be moved.


Filed under: v God is powerful, v God is relational, verse of the day